Practice Quiz for
Probability of Inheritance

No. of Questions= 6

INSTRUCTIONS: To answer a question, click the button in front of your choice. A response will appear in the window below the question to let you know if you are correct. Be sure to read the feedback. It is designed to help you learn the material. You can also learn by reading the feedback for incorrect answers.

1 Punnett squares can be used to predict the probability of:
a) being exposed to a contagious disease and contracting it
b) having an inherited disease or a genetically determined physical trait
c) both of the above
 
2 Punnett squares are used by geneticists to determine the probability of different offspring genotypes. In the one shown below, what letter(s) belong in the lower right box?
     
drawing of a Punnett square with heterozygous and homozygous parents; the possible offspring genotypes are not indicated, but there is a question mark in one of the blank squares
a) Aa
b) AA
c) aa
d) a
3 If two people who are both carriers for a genetically inherited fatal recessive disease decide to become parents, what will be the odds that their children will also be carriers?
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a) 1 out of 4
b) 2 out of 4
c) 3 out of 4
d) 4 out of 4
4 If a woman is homozygous normal and her husband is heterozygous for a genetically inherited recessive disease and they decide to become parents, what is the probability that they will have a healthy child?
     
a) 1 out of 4
b) 2 out of 4
c) 3 out of 4
d) 4 out of 4
5 If two parents are heterozygous for a genetically inherited dominant trait, what is the probability that they will have a child together who has this trait in his or her phenotype?
     
a) 25%
b) 50%
c) 75%
d) 100%
6 If two parents are homozygous for a genetically inherited recessive trait, what is the probability that they will have a child who does not have this trait in his or her phenotype?
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a) 0%
b) 25%
c) 50%
d) 100%
 


 

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