Flashcards for Sex and Marriage
Topic 5:  Residence Rules
(15 cards)

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The residence pattern in which a newly married couple moves in with or near the groom's father's house. (Hint: this is a common residence pattern in societies that have patrilineal descent.)

patrilocal residence

The main reason that patrilocal residence is common in societies that have patrilineal descent.

It keeps men near their male relatives from whom they will inherit status, property, knowledge, and other things of value.

The residence pattern in which a newly married couple moves in with or near the bride's mother's house. (Hint: this a common residence pattern in societies that have matrilineal descent.)

matrilocal residence

The main reason that matrilocal residence is common in societies that have matrilineal descent.

It keeps women near their female relatives from whom they will inherit statuses, jobs, or prerogatives.

The residence pattern in which a married couple establishes a new residence independent of both their families. (Hint: this is the most common residence pattern in North America and other industrialized nations in which the importance of kinship is minimized. It is also common in small-scale societies when economic hardship periodically requires a family to leave the community and move to a new area in order to find enough food.)

neolocal residence

The term for the residence pattern in which a newly married couple moves in with or near the groom's maternal uncle's house. (Hint: this residence pattern is strongly associated with matrilineal descent.)

avunculocal

The main rationale for avunculocal residence.

It allows men to live near their nearest elder matrilineal male relative from whom they will inherit statuses, jobs, or prerogatives.

A family consisting of a man, woman, and their children.

nuclear family

The nuclear family in which you are a child.

nuclear family of orientation

The nuclear family in which you are a parent.

nuclear family of procreation

A family consisting of two or more nuclear families tied together by bonds of descent. (Hint: this larger family usually contains living relatives from three or more generations.)

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extended family

A family consisting of two or more relatives of the same generation living together with their respective spouses and children. (Hint: these rare larger families typically consist of 1-2 generations.)

joint family

The kinds of societies that most commonly have extended, joint, and polygynous family households. (Hint: big families are economically advantageous in these kinds of societies because large, permanent labor groups are needed for the important subsistence activities.)

small-scale farming (horticultural) and pastoralist societies

The kinds of societies that most commonly have nuclear family households. (Hint: small families are economically advantages in these kinds of societies because geographic mobility is necessary.)

foraging societies in marginal environments where it is usually necessary to seasonally disperse the community and large-scale industrialized societies in which
jobs often require relocation to another part of the country or the world from time to time

The term for a nuclear family in which there is no continuing adult male functioning as a husband and father. This man is missing usually due to death, divorce, abandonment, or no marriage having taken place. In such families, the mother raises her children more or less alone and subsequently has the major role in their socialization.

matricentric (or matrifocused)